Job descriptionRepresents his/her district in the US House of Representatives, the lower chamber of the legislative branch of the United States. Term is two years.
Duties
  • Writes and votes on federal laws.

  • The House has the power to vote on impeachment (the Senate holds the trial).

  • If there is a tie between Presidential candidates in the Electoral College, the House has the power to choose the President.

Annual salary$174,000

Who’s Running?

Candace Valenzuela
Website: https://candacefor24.com/
Email: candace@candacefor24.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/candaceruns/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/candacefor24
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/Candacefor24/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOAvzI5rJJ17p1IdiIHbiIA
Democrat
Darren Hamilton
Website: https://www.votehamiltonforcongress.com/
Email: HamiltonForTexas24th@gmail.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HamiltonForTexas24th
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hamiltonfortexas24th/
Libertarian
Beth Van Duyne
Website: https://www.bethfortexas.com/
Email: contact@bethfortexas.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BethVanDuyneTX/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Bethvanduyne
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bethvanduynetx/
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/beth-van-duyne-60462a9/
Republican

Recent News Articles

Candidate Q&A

1. WHY ARE YOU THE BEST QUALIFIED CANDIDATE?
Candace Valenzuela
Darren Hamilton
Republican and Democrat adherents only seem to seek out information that fits with their existing biases, or appeals to their sensibilities or morals. That’s because the politics of “either-or” and “for-against” have created a political atmosphere where candidates never really discuss the issues; they only discuss their positions on the issues. If there really were a simplistic answer to all of our political woes, it would be some idealized campaign slogan that sounds great, but which would have a perfect failure rate in the real world. For all of their partisan bickering, nothing ever changes from the two-view stalemate with power that ebbs and flows with each election cycle.
I don’t have simplistic answers. The single most important idea that I can bring to Congress as a representative is “compromise”, a compromise that allows me to take the best parts of each side and put together something that will work for everybody. If you’re tired of the two-view stalemate where everybody talks but nobody says anything, perhaps it’s time for something new and someone different in Congress. The people of District 24 deserve a representative who is not going to get stuck in the stalemate of partisan politics.
Beth Van Duyne
2. WHAT ARE YOUR TOP FEW PRIORITIES IF ELECTED?
Candace Valenzuela
Darren Hamilton
Establishment of Congressional Term Limits – if it has been necessary for the Executive branch since 1951, why not for the Legislative branch? It seems to me that the longer a congressional officer has served, the farther removed that officer becomes from the actual needs of their constituency. Two elected terms (consecutive or non-consecutive) for Senators (or twelve years), and five elected terms (consecutive or non-consecutive) for Representatives (or ten years).
Electoral College Reform - Yes, the Electoral College has its problems, but that does not mean it should be eliminated altogether. Instead, I believe it should be returned to some of its original design parameters. Return the distribution of electoral votes to the candidate who won in each Congressional District, and eliminate the “270 to win” threshold.
Immigration Reform - The Old Parties will never agree on "comprehensive immigration reform" because they look at the issue from wildly divergent perspectives, and will not accept a 'middle-ground' solution. One “middle ground” solution would be to split the current Immigration and Naturalization Service into two separate agencies; one to focus on service, and the other to focus on enforcement. By doing this simple split, both processes would flow more smoothly.
Beth Van Duyne
3. WHAT WOULD YOUR IDEAL VOTING RIGHTS ACT INCLUDE?
Candace Valenzuela
Darren Hamilton
My ideal "Voting Rights Act" would include only three conditions: (1) that the individual be a citizen of the United States over 18 years of age, (2) that the individual be registered to vote within their state of residence, and (3) that any additional condition that could be universally applied to a group without an individual mandate would be deemed null and void.
In an ideal society, a voting rights document would be unnecessary. The right of U.S. citizens to vote are guaranteed by no fewer than five Constitutional Amendments (15, 19, 23, 24, 16), and that should be more than adequate. Unfortunately, we are still working toward "a more perfect Union", so I recognize that there are several specific conditions that are included in the current legislation to curtail discrimination. I can only hope that, as we continue to mature as a nation, such conditions will eventually become unnecessary.
Beth Van Duyne
4. WHAT SHOULD CONGRESS PRIORITIZE TO IMPROVE THE US HEALTHCARE SYSTEM?
Candace Valenzuela
Darren Hamilton
I believe that there should be an expansion of health savings accounts (HSAs) and plan portability. If an individual has their own healthcare plan, they should be able to carry it to and from any location, even across state jurisdictions. At a federal level, my efforts would be directed toward streamlining the FDA, and removing administrative roadblocks set by the government to prevent private and free market enterprises from developing and testing new medications. Beyond this, I remain unclear as to what any federal legislation can do to make improvements to the healthcare system.
Libertarians, as a rule, believe that the competition of the open market should be used to determine and set affordable pricing in these areas. A one-size-fits-all approach does not work for anything, but especially not for health insurance, and people should have as many choices as the free market can bear.
Beth Van Duyne
5. HOW WOULD YOU RATE THE HOUSE'S RESPONSE TO THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC? WHAT WOULD YOU CHANGE OR ADD?
Candace Valenzuela
Darren Hamilton
Since the House's only response (so far) has been to authorize a nominal, one-time payment to citizens, I would characterize the House's response to the pandemic as "tepid at best". Granted that no one could have predicted that this pandemic's effects would last as long as they have, but I suspect that if the standard precautions initially outlined by health experts had been followed, much of the negative impact that currently exists could have been avoided.
Generally, Libertarians oppose the idea that the government has the ability to force individuals or businesses to do anything, but opinions on the matter vary. From a federal perspective, I would have encouraged small businesses within my district to remain open or to re-open while operating on a remote or restricted basis. To that end, I would have proposed or supported a federal program designed to financially assist small- to medium-sized (but not large-sized) businesses to make those changes to their infrastructures that would be necessary for them to take adequate precautions to reduce the possibility of spreading the virus.
Beth Van Duyne
6. YOUNG PEOPLE TODAY FACE PARTICULAR CHALLENGES, SUCH AS AFFORDING HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING, FINDING SECURE EMPLOYMENT, AFFORDABLE HOUSEING, AND CONCERNS WITH CLIMATE CHANGE. WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR ASSISTING THE NEXT GENERATION OF CITIZENS?
Candace Valenzuela
Darren Hamilton
This question touches on several disparate areas, many of which are more local issues than national issues. That said, as a member of Congress, I would focus on reducing and/or eliminating government interference in the lives of our citizens, e.g., reducing and/or eliminating specific taxes thereby letting citizens keep more of the money that they earn instead of requiring them to allow the government to simply take it from them. Additionally, I would introduce or support a bill that would remove the government from interfering in the education process, specifically the government's guarantee to underwrite student loans. Removing government interference from the education process would prohibit colleges from fleecing the government through their students' tuition. If fewer students are able to afford to attend colleges, then as a result, colleges would be forced to reduce the costs of their tuition so that prospective students could afford to attend that college.
People, left to their own devices without interference from the government, will create whatever is needed to make their lives better. Politicians and taxes are not a prerequisite to citizens building a better life for themselves. They are, more often than they are not, more of a hindrance to it, and Libertarians understand this truth.
Beth Van Duyne
7. HOW DO YOU PLAN TO KEEP IN TOUCH WITH CONSTITUENTS SO YOU KNOW WHAT THEIR CONCERNS AND PRIORITIES ARE?
Candace Valenzuela
Darren Hamilton
Two words: social media. The advancement of social media platforms over the past decade has been nothing short of surprising, and it would be foolish not to take advantage of it.
When he votes on an issue in Congress, Libertarian Justin Amash uses social media to explain why he voted the way he did to the people within his district (and outside of it). I plan to make use of several social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, and web pages to enable the same sort of direct interaction. The advantage is that the citizens within this district will have have a more direct form of contact with their elected representative through social media platforms than, for instance, simply writing a letter. Responses and answers to citizen issues can also be more direct and, if necessary, more personal.
Beth Van Duyne
8. ANYTHING ELSE YOU'D LIKE TO ADD?
Candace Valenzuela
Darren Hamilton
I cannot presume to know which issues (other than those already addressed in these questions) will become a priority in the next session of Congress. I have a few personal project issues that I hope can be addressed such as term limits for Congress, a revision (but not elimination) of the Electoral College, and steps to address student loan debt, but there is one issue that I believe may become a more immediate cause of the moment.
As a statistician and analyst, I work with computer systems and computer security on a regular basis and, without any reservation, I believe that the most pernicious threat to American interests is cyber-warfare. The sheer volume of information available for anyone (especially foreign agents) with the skills to get to it makes this a paramount domestic policy issue. Congress should ensure that funds for cyber-security projects are not starved, and should encourage the expansion of more advanced cyber-security systems, including research into and development of quantum computing, and of artificial intelligence. The advancement of these projects will do more to address additional domestic threats, such as human slavery and sex trafficking, than any increase in enforcement could hope to accomplish.
Beth Van Duyne